Google+ is Shutting Down After a Vulnerability Exposed 500,000 Users' Data

Google is going to shut down its social media network Google+ after the company suffered a massive data breach that exposed the private data of hundreds of thousands of Google Plus users to third-party developers.
According to the tech giant, a security vulnerability in one of Google+'s People APIs allowed third-party developers to access data for more than 500,000 users, including their usernames, email addresses, occupation, date of birth, profile photos, and gender-related information.

New Privilege Escalation Flaw Affects Most Linux Distributions

An Indian security researcher has discovered a highly critical flaw in X.Org Server package that impacts OpenBSD and most Linux distributions, including Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS, Red Hat, and Fedora.
Xorg X server is a popular open-source implementation of the X11 system (display server) that offers a graphical environment to a wider range of hardware and OS platforms. It serves as an intermediary between client and user applications to manage graphical displays.

Hacker Discloses New Windows Zero-Day Exploit On Twitter

A security researcher with Twitter alias SandboxEscaper—who two months ago publicly dropped a zero-day exploit for Microsoft Windows Task Scheduler—has yesterday released another proof-of-concept exploit for a new Windows zero-day vulnerability.
SandboxEscaper posted a link to a Github page hosting a proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit for the vulnerability that appears to be a privilege escalation flaw residing in Microsoft Data Sharing (dssvc.dll).

British Airways Data Breach Takes Off Again with 185K More Victims

The news comes on the heels of a breach at Cathay Pacific exposing 9.4 million people.

British Airways said that the data breach it first reported in September is larger than previously thought. It has added an additional 185,000 victims to the official tally.

The airline said that hackers may have stolen personal data connected to an additional 77,000 payment cards, including name, billing address, email address and card payment information – including card number, expiry date and CVV. And, it uncovered a further 108,000 cards that were exposed without CVV.